1-800-GOT-MOJO? | Brian Scudamore, Founder & CEO of O2E Brands, 1-800-GOT-JUNK

1-800-GOT-MOJO? |  Brian Scudamore, Founder & CEO of O2E Brands, 1-800-GOT-JUNK cover image
Thane Calder talks with his entrepreneurial crush Brian Scudamore to explain how his business-building mojo is all grounded in a clear vision.

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Transcript

Thane
Thane

Hey, welcome to Mojo Moments. This is the place you go to get your mojo. We're going to talk with Brian Scudamore. He's not just a dude with a cool name, but he is the founder of one 800, got junk, plus a lot of other cool companies with very cool names.

We're going to talk a little about that. Talk about the companies, but we're not really here to do a business show. We're here to talk mojo. So we're going to deep dive into his brain and pick out those things that make him awesome and make the people around them live up to the awesome-ness. So stay tuned here it is.

So Brian, welcome to mojo moments.

Brian
Brian

Thank you Thane.

Thane
Thane

It's good to have you on, we haven't had a lot of time to hang out together, in our past lives, but I, I kind of feel, I, I know you. And that's probably because I've been following you for years, which can sounds a bit creepy, but in the good sense I've been following everything you've been up to.

Brian
Brian

Yeah.

Thane
Thane

But I have a bone to pick. I know it's not a good way to start a mojo podcast, but I'm going to, I have a bone to pick with you.

Brian
Brian

Let's do it.

Thane
Thane

Okay. So I've been calling you my kind of friend, Brian Scudamore for a long time. And as you just noticed, I mispronounced your name. Yeah. And I actually never knew that you pronounce your name Scudamore until I listened to, as in preparation of our podcast today, some other podcasts and your own, very own podcast that you used to do, and you're like pronouncing yourself Scudamore and I'm like, fuck.

That screws everything up. So it, can you, like, what happened? Like why did you mispronounce your own name?

Brian
Brian

Just to make it complicated, you know, just to confuse the heck out of people.

Thane
Thane

Are you at Scudamore?

Brian
Brian

 Yeah. You know, it's funny. I mean, some people get their knickers in a knot over mispronunciations of their name, but it's like, Hey, if you don't know someone and you haven't spent a lot of time with them, Who cares. It doesn't bug me.

Thane
Thane

Because Scudamore, you know, I see Scud missile type thing going on, but amore like there's this like energy of the Scud missile, and then this sort of love , amore or at least that's how I read it.

Brian
Brian

 Yeah. It's actually of Italian descent. Scudo means shield and a amore love. And I was a, at a cooking school in Italy and Palla the chef.

She goes Scudamore day. She goes. Shield of love. She goes, that's like a condom. She, she started calling me condom and I'm like, let's stick with Scudamore.

Thane
Thane

That's a good segue into our whole podcast. We're here to talk about mojo after all. So. You know, in, in my eyes, you're famous. Everyone knows that Brian Scudamore is the guy behind the most famous of your brands, which is 1-800-GOT-JUNK.

But I think for a little context, for our listenership, uh, I think it's worthwhile to hear your story. I know you've told a lot of times I know the story. I can hear it again, cause I always like hearing it, but just for the sake of everyone, give us the story.

Brian
Brian

I was one course short of graduating from high school. I wasn't a great well-focused kid in school. I liked to learn. I just couldn't sit in a classroom. I have trouble sitting still. So I was one course short of graduation and all my friends were going to UBC and different universities. And I had this fear of missing out and I was in a McDonald's drive through, I see this beat up old pickup truck plywood sides in front of, or on the box filled with junk, said Mark's hauling on the side.

And I looked at that truck and I'm like, I'm going to find a way to go to college and I'm going to buy myself a truck and that's how I'm going to pay for it. My parents wouldn't give me any money for college because clearly there was no good return on investment there if I couldn't finish high school.

And I was the, you know, one of the only kids, if not the only one who walked across the graduation stage, and didn't get an actual diploma cause I didn't formally graduate. Yeah. You know, I got this, thanks for attending school kind of letter from the principal, but I didn't get an actual diploma. So I'm in that McDonald's drive through and I decide I'm going to buy a truck.

Started a company a week later called the rubbish boys cost me 700 bucks for that truck cost me about $1,300 in repairs, two weeks later, or a lot more than the cost of the truck. And I started learning so much about running a business by doing it while I also attended college business school and which I talked my way into and I found, you know, my real passion was I love to learn.

I love to grow and I was doing a better job at it, from what I thought, studying a business on the streets versus in school. So with one year left. In my degree, I approached my dad and I said, Hey dad, I got some great news for you dropping out of school. He said, I don't see how that's good news. And I said, look at the opportunity.

I get to build this business and grow it from the hundred thousand dollar business it is today and see what I can build. I'm learning more on the streets than I am in school and making a decision. And he tried to talk me out of it and said, listen, your business, uh, opportunity will always be there. Why don't you just get your degree done?

You got one year left and I topsy turvy at it and said, university of British Columbia will always be there should I choose to go back? But my business opportunity is there for me to grow versus someone else building it and off I went and never graduated, never went back to school and the rest is history.

Thane
Thane

So the rest is history back then it was a hundred thousand dollar business. Just throw a number out just for the, for the....

Brian
Brian

So I know this is a Canadian podcast, so I'll give Canadian dollars, but we are, uh, we're over half a billion in revenue between 1-800-GOT-JUNK, Wow One Day Painting and Shack Shine.

Thane
Thane

Let's just get that out there for people. He said a half a billion, so there's like 500 and then a three zeros and three more zeros. This is big.

Brian
Brian

 Yeah. And you know, and I don't throw the numbers out in any sort of way and to brag or anything. I'm proud of what we've built and how we've built it with the great people we have and watching franchise partners take an opportunity and grow. To me it's just a scoreboard. We're building trusted brands. Trust is a way more important word than a billion. Uh, for us, it's just having fun building great companies, loving what we do. The money is just a score court card of the significance, the size.

Thane
Thane

And you know what, you're not bullshitting. Like I really believe you. I know people say that, It's not about the numbers, it's about the people, it's about all our mojo, I actually believe you this time compared to most people in the business world who will say that. And I'll tell you why, several years ago, I think maybe around maybe when we met, because I was doing stuff out in Vancouver, at CloudRaker, and we were trying to collaborate with you on a project and I actually had jumped to get out of the house. So I called up the local franchise of Montreal of 1-800 Got Junk, you know, come get the stuff, super polite, you know, and I actually think of it, someone, I don't know who answers the phone, whatever it worked. And there was an hour given compared to like the cable guy, which, where it's like, we'll show up somewhere between 6:00 AM and around midnight and you're like, can you narrow that down a little? It was like, it was like, I think I was given an actual hour. It really was, it was decent enough. There was like, wow. So then that happens. I was like, that's cool, but they're never going to show up on, of course they show up on time. And then the two dudes that came and it was the most awkward piece to get out of the house.

It was out of the first of all, out of my basement through the basement door where I bang my head all the time. An Ikea piece, like one of these sort of, you know, like wall, uh, units that I want to get out and it was awkward and I didn't want to take it apart. Cause I think maybe they recycled whatever.

So they, they very gently, they took their, maybe I shouldn't say this because he might have rules around this, but yeah. Cause we didn't want them. It was a finished basement. We didn't want them walking on the carpet. So we were like, can you take your shoes off? They did that, I'm not going to give names.

Don't give anyone shit. So they took them. Cause you might have rules. You may have rules, but they took their shoes off. Cause we were like, we don't want, you know, in the winters and Montreal with the salt and all that stuff. So they take their boots off. They go across, they move this thing. It's a pain in the ass, super polite.

And at one point, and I think, like I said, it was around the time meeting you. So I was like, Hey, so you're one of the franchise owners. So he says, no, no, no. I just, I just work here and I was like, Whoa, like down the levels of like accountability two dudes who just work for this. Cause you know, often in franchises, it's kind of like.

It the, the quality and the, and the mojo sort of degrades. And it just was like, maybe I landed on the right team, but I'm like, there's something good going on here?

Brian
Brian

Well, we're not perfect, but we have great systems, hiring systems to find the right happy people, franchise partners that we recruit and then systems to train and hold people accountable to the quality that we expect. Um, we've got, you know, it's interesting. We've got something called EFA is exceptional focus areas. What areas do we want to make sure we're exceptional on? And with 1-800-GOT-JUNK. As an example, it's on-time service upfront rates, clean, shiny trucks and friendly uniformed drivers.

You covered most of it. You didn't say if the truck looked good and I get in Montreal winters, I've lived in Montreal in the winter and hard to keep a truck clean, but you know, we take pride in those things and that's our focus.

Thane
Thane

Well, anyway, so obviously your EFA's, are, are working and it goes all the way down the chain.

So you're, you have a great successful business or multiple of them, uh, and your story's awesome, but that's not why we're here today. We're not here to talk. We're here to talk about mojo. So the mojo podcast is born out of a very honest place. You know, I started CloudRaker 20 years ago, you know, digital creative agency humming along.

Mainly ups, a couple downs and in 2019. So last year I was just, I wasn't feeling it anymore. I lost my mojo. So that's why we do mojo podcasts. Uh, it's actually very selfish because it's really just to help me get my mojo back.

Brian
Brian

There you go.

Thane
Thane

So, um, it's like therapy  for free. It's not that free because by the time, you know, everyone gets paid. It's a very expensive therapy. Yeah. Yeah, on one of your podcasts, it wasn't yours or your on the guy who wrote the book. I think the one thing or whatever, uh, you may, you know, he had a fancy book and he was varying in on, you know, the one thing, one thing and you zeroed in on for, you know, your mojo, you talked a lot about vision, painting a vision, bring us in on that, like this whole idea of painting a vision.

Brian
Brian

Yeah, well, I call it the painted picture. And to me, we've got a quote up in the office. It's a Walt Disney quote. It's kind of fun to do the impossible. I see my role as somebody who can inspire big possibilities and big thinking and others. And you never know if you dream big and it's big enough, your heart believes in it.

It might actually just happen. So vision to me is people that can see that impossible goal that they're chasing that their, their mojo is all in. They want to make this thing happen no matter what and where I discovered the power of vision. So I was a part of EO, the entrepreneur organization for years, still am.

And when I first joined one of the first retreats we had, we went on a retreat where they said, you know, you've got a crystal ball of your future, you've got to have a clear picture of where you're going. And I didn't have a picture. In fact, I was surrounded by entrepreneurs who had much bigger businesses than mine, much more glamorous than junk removal.

And I said, Oh man, I'm kind of failing out here. I didn't finish school. Didn't finish college. Uh, didn't have a lot of money to build something didn't have, um, necessarily even the best idea. And I was at a million dollars in revenue. So. I went to my parents' cottage and learned this idea of take a retreat if you want to solve a problem, go to a creative place. And they got this little shack. If you will, on the water. And I sat down on a nice sunny summer day and took out a sheet of paper and said, Brian enough of the doom loop, start thinking pure possibility. What could this look like if there weren't barriers of money and intelligence and so on.

So I pulled out a sheet of paper and I started writing and I never changed a word in this picture that I created for five years out. I said within five years, by December 31st, 2003, we would be the FedEx of junk removal, clean, shiny trucks, friendly uniform drivers, we would be on the Oprah Winfrey show.

We'd be in the top 30 cities in North America. I had all these big dreams, five years. Yeah, actually right to the date of five years, uh, about two weeks early, we hit our top 30th Metro. We were on the Oprah Winfrey show. We were the FedEx of junk removal, all these things that were ideas, possibility in my mind actually happened.

And why they happened was I was so clear on the picture in my mind that when I wrote it out, I looked at this and I went, wow, I don't feel a doom loop. I'm excited. I've got mojo beyond belief that I am going to chase this goal. And I took the document and I started to share this painted picture with people around me.

And if anyone in your podcast wants to see an article I wrote on painted picture and how to create one or, or even an example of our painted picture, they can fire me a message on LinkedIn or social media. But what I did is I took this picture and I started sharing it with people around me, closest friends, employees, all that sort of stuff.

And, uh, it was interesting with my employees that did two things, separated people over a few weeks into one of two camps, one camp that said, well, I look at this top 30 metros, Oprah, you're smoking some hope dope, dude. Like this is not happening. And the other half of the group said, wow, This is exciting.

I can see what you see and I want to be a part of it. And so we've got a lot of people out of my tiny little company at the time. And then we had a few champions of that vision. We started to build a new team all around. Let's chase this painted picture and make it happen. And that's what we continue to do today with shack shine. Wow. One day painting, they all have painted pictures of what the shiny rosy future looks.

Thane
Thane

So I love that story, in a small, was it small? I did that, but for my personal life, when I was like 28 years old, I'd been with the same girl for six years. And in every January, uh, of a new year in that period, I would get up and get up really early, like crazy early, like 4:00 AM.

And I'd start imagining what my year would look like. You know, it'd be January, you know, most people are planning their year. And so I was like, I'm sitting down with a piece of paper and is okay. I was like, Fuck that, what am I going to do with my life? Like, what am I, I want out of this and I won't go into all the detail, but the first thing that just came to mind as I started as like, well, I know next year I'll be 29 years old and the year after I'll be 30 and I just started crosses, this, it was a legal sheet of paper. I turned it sideways and I just want to cross until I ran out of space. And I was like at 68 years old or whatever, and I ran out of space and I was like, okay, that I could see the timeline. Hopefully it doesn't end more than the paper end.

And I was like, what do I want? And I was like, Oh, I want to take my kids. Helicopter skiing. Mean, I was like, shit. That means I need kids and I need to have those kids with somebody. I was like, well, she's sleeping over there, six years. I guess I got to get on with this thing. So I've told my wife, I waited about 10 years till I told her. I said, you know why we got married, to go heli skiing with the kids. She's like, how do I fit into this?

Am I allowed to go on this trip?  No, no, no. I'm taking the kids heli skiing. Anyway, that's a small, different, a different type of painted picture, but that's a,

Brian
Brian

But you did the same thing I did. You came up with what many would think is a crazy possibility and you could see the picture in your mind.

And when you latched on to it, you, I'm assuming you've gone hella skiing with your kids.

Thane
Thane

Well, it's coming up because they have to get a certain, in my mind, I was like, when I did the math, I was like, okay, well, I'm not going to have them, you know, tomorrow. And when I have them installed, you're not going to ski when they're too, like, they're going to be a certain age.

Right. But what's interesting in that. And I'm just going to riff on that by putting it out there and sharing it with my wife. She's not the biggest skier in the world, but she's the one that continually pushed to make sure that the level of skiing is up to scratch because she knows this trip's got to happen.

And what came out of that, I was like, Oh, I gotta earn a certain living. Like, you know, you don't just go heli skiing. You gotta have a bit of money for that. And so all these sort of things poured out of that. So, so anyway, I think I did it, but I've never done it for the business. I did it more on the personal life.

And I love that you did that for your business and you have a central discipline for each of your businesses to paint these up. So when you did it for your other companies, did it have the same level mojo as the first one?

Brian
Brian

Absolutely. You know, I've got three kids and I've got three businesses. And for your listeners who might have kids, you know, we don't generally pick favorites.

I mean, maybe some days. Right. But, you know, I have just as much mojo for wow one day painting. As they do 1-800-GOT-JUNK. As I do shack shine. They're different kids at different stages with different challenges. And that's what keeps it exciting. And so the mojo is there because I believe in the longterm vision of each one of our brands has to be over a hundred million in revenue, which is again less about the number and more about we're North American wide.

We're the most trusted brand in any of those home services. And I just, I love what I do. I mean, I really truly love getting out of bed in the morning and watching things grow and working to make things grow. And so much of it starts with the painted picture of what do we envision? What do I envision from feedback with people in the company, sharing it with our franchise partners and they're the ones executing.

So, you know, I get to play this sort of imagination game and see what, how big I can dream. But others that they see what I see. They're like, okay. Cause I never know how to make it happen. I didn't know how we were going to get on Oprah, but I saw myself giving her a big hug and I did give her a big hug after the show.

Thane
Thane

This is pre COVID. Right?

Brian
Brian

Exactly. And I said, you know, I saw that in my mind, but someone on my team who was in PR made it their mission for 14 months to pitch and pitch and pitch Harpo studios until. We got it. So the power of vision it's, I mean, it blows my mind, but it's magical stuff.

Thane
Thane

So when you develop this painted picture, what's the line between you scripting that or, you know, bringing the canvas to life versus, Hey, let's do a company retreat and try and paint together.

Like. My feeling is that doesn't work, even though it would be a nice idea, like what's the line between you maybe grabbing signals from people, but you're painting it versus let's do this as a group exercise. How does that play out?

Brian
Brian

That's a great question Thane. So if I think of my business and the model of how we run OtoE brands, which stands for ordinary to exceptional, we're making all these businesses exceptional through customer experience.

I'm very fortunate to have had, uh, the same COO and president for nine years. Eric Church now what's great about Eric is Eric is the implementer and he knows I'm the visionary. I envision it. He goes and makes the magic a reality. Now there's some overlap there, of course, where he'll share his ideas and I'm listening to them, but we're not sitting down as an entire company and painting the canvas together.

It's me going, what do I see based on the conversations I've had with my team and people over time, they helped change and inspire and, um, tweak my thinking. But I think you have one visionary and in the same way that I get out of Eric's way, so he can execute and do things, the Eric Church, his right way.

Um, I might feed into some ideas, but he's executing. I'm visioning. And we're fortunate that we've been able to be a great team and be at this, the growth of the business allows us to specialize in our areas of passion more and more every day.

Thane
Thane

So you're saying you, you get excited, you know, every day to get out, but do you have lulls? Do you have lows? Do you, do you get less mojo? And

Brian
Brian

 Of course, yeah. I think, you know, here we are in a pandemic. Um, yeah, I think March, April. We're really hard. I mean, I had almost zero mojo. It was survivability of the businesses and health and mental health. And it was a challenge. I mean, we were on zoom after zoom, after zoom calls nonstop for months.

And it was too much while having being in lock down with kids is as you know, most of us were, and you're just trying to manage it was, it was a nightmare. Things are. Different now, because I think there's a little more, you know, you're not being chased by a bear and looking over your shoulder nonstop, you're actually, you've got like a moment to just stop and kind of breathe and go, okay. The bear is somewhere. This is scary, but we've got a little more room and space to. To work through some of the challenges and to be excited about the opportunities that come, you know, so as an example, the business of our, of our three that was hit the hardest was wow one day painting, junk removal, Hey, pull up a truck. You can still get it safely. The customer doesn't have to be near it. Shack shine, windows, gutters, power washing. No, it's fairly outside stuff, but wow one day people are like, yeah, I don't want you in my house painting. You know, I think of cleaners right now. We, you know, made service where, you know, we've got a couple of cleaners that would come in and clean our house.

And for a couple of months there, we're like, you know what, we'll clean our own house. Like, we don't want anyone in our house. Germs is what you just think of. Right. And as we've learned more about COVID, it's like, great. You can have someone come in your house clean while you're not there. And then they leave and you come back.

So we just make sure that Mondays we're out of the house during a certain time when our cleaners come. And so with wow one day painting, they've roared back and they're growing faster than they did last year, which is exciting because our value prop went way up when people go. So you mean I can still paint and your model is. Wow one day painting. You'll get it done in a day. You're in and out in a day. And I can come back into my home and not have to worry about you coming and going every single day to set up clean up. It's great. The value prop went way, way up.

Thane
Thane

Yeah that makes sense.

Brian
Brian

I mean, that's a gift from COVID.

Thane
Thane

You realize, you know, I've spent my career or at least the last 20 years in digital branding and creative and, and here you are like the fricking King of branding.

So while one day painting. Okay. Does it sometimes, is it two days?

Brian
Brian

People are reasonable and understand that, Hey, if you're in a 2,500 square foot house yeah, of course we can get the interior done in a day. You need three coats in some rooms. Yeah, we can do that. You've got a little prep and stuff that needs to be done.

We'll come in the night before, just so it dries properly. If you've got a 12,000 square foot home and you're, you're saying, get it done in a day, you know, that can be different. Um, having access to enough people to go in there and do it properly, you know? So again, customers understand our value prop is getting it done in the day.

Most people don't believe you can do it in a day, but you can, and everyone gets it. When you explain that everyone knows one room can be painted in a day by one person. If you've got a large room, you might put two people in, but it's just a numbers game. You take all the rooms and it's coordination. It. Doesn't people think, well, I don't want you to rush. We're not rushing. We're still painting at the same speed. We just don't have the same setup and prep and clean up and everything. And it's coordinated. So yes, it's about getting it done in a day on the interior. And then the exterior, you're more limited by weather and what can happen there.

But. You know, we're, we're still not taking the two weeks that companies would, you know, somebody was painting across my street the other day and I walked by and I'm like, this is awesome. So here we are in a pandemic and there's four ladders going up the side of the house. They're at least six feet apart from each other.

There's these shiny uniformed, green and white, wow one day painters talking to each other and smiling while they're painting the outside of the house. And I'm just like, how good is that? They're doing it in a coordinated way. Socially distance. It's fantastic.

Thane
Thane

Speaking of painting. So during the pandemic, I went to my cottage and we have behind the house load guest cottage.

And we were like, we need a project. You know, the only living being, using the guest cottage where the mice were like, maybe if we paint it, they'll leave. It didn't work out. But anyway, so we, and my wife's like, fun family project, so it was fun. We're all in there painting at night and doing all that. But as, as the weeks wore on two months, cause it was, it was seventies, wood, and we were painting a white, we wanted this sort of Scandinavian vibe.

It really took a lot of layers. Okay. And essentially I found myself alone, like at midnight, drinking beer painting going, wait, what happened to the family project here? We are talking it up, that it was a family project in the beginning. And then it was my project.

 You realize, Brian, I want to go into business with you. You know, I pitched you a few years ago. I don't know if you remember, but the bike company and we actually have the plan is called the fits 100 plan for 100 million. And we'll come back to that at another moment. Uh, but that's not why you're on the mojo podcast. I like to like dig into something that I know you do.

We talked about this years ago, which is your weekly routine, because I realize I'm trying to do a weekly routine that I'm giving myself permission to do. Since COVID, which I never felt I was allowed to do before, but share with us your weekly routine.

Brian
Brian

Well, I mean, starting with the daily, I get up at 5:55, just precise it's, I can't sleep in, it's ahead of the kids getting up and I can focus and do some of my own personal, uh, routines, health exercise, all that sort of stuff.

But my, my weekly routine is Monday is my. Pre COVID I'll explain them then I'll, we'll talk about how it's changed, but Mondays I would be out of the office and usually I'd work in coffee shops and because I'm ADD and need to move around and change scenery. Sometimes it'd be in six coffee shops in a day. And, uh, I like the noise.

Thane
Thane

I now know why you have add is because you're having six coffees, at least.

Brian
Brian

So much caffeine, but I'm not getting distractions from employees, people on my team who want to ask me stuff. So is I'm out of the office. I'm focused, catching up on email thinking through strategy planning and so on. Tuesday to Thursday are my focus days where I'm just back to back to back on meetings. And that would generally be in the office with the team and so on. And I like to schedule everything. I just feel, you know, I'll schedule a 22 minute meeting cause I don't want it to take half an hour.

I've got all these little tweak, uh, sort of hacks. And then Friday is my free day and that's my day to go skiing with the kids, pull some of, one of them out of school, go up to Whistler, um, go for a paddle on the paddle board, uh, go for a bike ride, pick my kids up from school, whatever it is, but just time away from the business.

So I'll go hard for the four days. And then I got that Friday where I can have as a free day. Now what's interesting is I lost that routine during COVID because everybody's expectation was you're at home. You're on zoom. You've got nothing else to do. Like everyone's got to work every single day. And so it took me a few months to get back to talking to my assistant, Jen and saying, Jen, can you help me out here?

Don't book things Fridays. Don't book things Mondays, let's figure out how to do things a little bit differently. And so I've gotten back to that, which has been incredibly important. Um, and I've had to take control of it because it's something I need. And so, you know, similarly I'll, I'll flip it and tell you how my holiday routine is.

And we practice this throughout the company, as we expect people to go dark. And so the hack is I get Jen, my assistant to change my path's code to my email and my social media, when I'm going dark. And I can't check any of it and she can't reach me because I've got a backup in Eric. And so, you know, when I went to Italy and France last year for five weeks with the family, I didn't hear once from anyone, no texts, nothing.

And I believe that you need to disconnect and recharge. And that's where I get my most creative ideas. So even during COVID, while we are fortunate enough to have a place of Whistler, In the mountains. Uh, that's where I spent most of my August mountain biking and paddle boarding with the kids, but I still went dark, even though I was in the same place I'd been working for a few months.

Cause I'm just like, I need a break. I need to focus on the kids. Have fun. And it works.

Thane
Thane

So I think that I finally started doing what you're doing and I think you might've put in my brain. So my Mondays is like my day to focus on stuff. And then I want to go super-intense Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and then Fridays.

It doesn't mean I'm unplugged, but I might do business calls. But to me they're just fun stuff. You know, I don't go paddle boarding stuff, but I've given myself permission, which I didn't do before. And I won't go into my own psychobabble on that because we don't have time today, but I figured out why. My previous business partner would judge the shit out of that because his dad judged it. So it was a lot of daddy issues going on. My question is, would I realize would held me back pre COVID to doing what something like you're, you do. And in my own way, was how does that apply to the rest of the team? How do you hold that up and go, well, this is what I'm doing. Do you get permission to the rest of the team to do that?

Like how does, how does that play out? And if you want, and I can edit that out. If,

Brian
Brian

Um, I wrote an article in the wall street journal about my go dark, and I got a whole ton of negative comments from strangers who are like, Oh, it must be nice to be King. Look at you and getting to have all this time off, going dark or taking your Fridays and this and that.

And I was like, huh. I must not have done a good job with the article. And I clarified and I used it as a jump off point with my company to say, Whoa, this wasn't about me. This is about, I want everyone in the company to have this and do this. We give everybody five weeks paid vacation in the company and we expect them to take it off and go dark.

So it's been hard, you know, our, our managing directors of our brands, the head of our brands, you know, we've had to work with them to coach them to say, Yes. I know it's fun to be on email and that you love running the business, but you need to take that time and go dark. Your family needs you, your creative juice recharging needs you.

Thane
Thane

But I get the holiday one, but what about the weekly routine? Like how does that play out?

Brian
Brian

Yeah. You know, so, so for me, it's people understand that I'm tapping into how I work best and we try and encourage people to do the same.

Thane
Thane

To find their own routine.

Brian
Brian

Yeah. I mean, there's a lot of flexibility too, you know? What makes you work best within the company? There's certain things like our daily huddle meeting, which is now of course, through zoom 10:55, every single day people, unless they're on vacation, need to be on that.

But other than that, there's a lot of flexibility, even pre COVID of, Hey, whatever makes you operate at your best. Think through honestly what you need and then go, go make it happen.

Thane
Thane

I like that.

Brian
Brian

There's too much structure in the world. I think it's using your own structure that works for you. It's going back to the me in high school and me in elementary school. I love learning. I just can't sit in a freaking classroom.

Thane
Thane

So this is the best fricking segueway into, because we are on a time constraint today and I appreciate it. And we're going to be actually on time. Normally we do the rabbit hole five. We, we do five questions that are supposed to be fast, but they always end up being rabbit holes.

That's why we renamed it. Uh, so we're just going to do the fifth one because we don't have enough time to do the others. And you know what we're allowed because it's our show. The fifth one that I asked every single person. And you just talked about high school. I have a 16 year old male, oldest son is 16.

Um, this is my hack to getting advice to give him. And then my other kids, when they turned 16, what would be the advice that you give yourself to your 16 year old self based on everything you've lived and where you are today?

Brian
Brian

Yeah, I would say you're, you know, Brian, you're going to make a ton of mistakes. And you're going to make them over and over, and it's going to be hard in your life. But if you can tap into those failures, as moments of learning and understanding that every failure and mistake you make is a gift towards a better life, then you got it made. And you know, probably took me till about 40 years old to realize that every failure is a gift. I wrote a book about it called WTF.

Thane
Thane

Oh yeah.

Brian
Brian

And I, you know, failure, failure is a gift. I failed so many freaking times, but I've learned from every one of those. There you go. I like it.

Thane
Thane

For the listeners we have in our belief books, dare to fail, but WTF is better because it, you know, sounds more badass, willing to fail.

So you that's great advice, man. I have so many more questions I could go into, but we don't have time.

Brian
Brian

You know what though? It was time well spent. I enjoyed my time with you and, uh, It's been great. I love this stuff. Cause you, you start reflecting on things in your life and business and thoughts. So thank you so much Thane for having me. It's uh, it's great. Fantastic.

Thane
Thane

Thank you, dude. Super, appreciate it. Be safe.

Brian
Brian

You too.

Thane
Thane

Keep up the mojo.

Does he have Mojo or what? I had so many more questions that I wanted to get into. I wanted to go down that rabbit hole of going, does everybody need to have the vision? I know for the business, we got to that one, but even in your personal life, because maybe some people don't need that in their lives to live a happy life.

Do, do you need that painted picture for you to live fulfilled? We got to have him back on, cause we, we got to debate that. Okay guys, that was our mojo moments for Brian Scudamore. Big, thanks to Chris Velan, playing us out here and remember slam the like buttons, slam and hit them up with the five stars.

Bye.

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