2020: Week 51 | YouTube Takes Aim at Trolls

2020: Week 51 | YouTube Takes Aim at Trolls cover image
This week Mark and Gisela discuss: Twitter and Snapcat’s more harmonious union, Facebook finally gets sued by the US government, & YouTube takes aim at the Trolls.

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Transcript

Mark
Mark

Welcome to click bait and switch a marketing podcast tha tries to cut through the bullshit and hook you up what you need to know what you don't and what stories should be getting more love than they're getting I'm Mark Dolynskyj on the other mic, which is Gisela Sleizer on today's show, Twitter and Snapchat form a more harmonious union. Facebook finally gets sued by the U S government and YouTube takes aim at the trolls. To start Twitter and snap. A match made in stories. Oh yeah. What's going on.

Gisela
Gisela

Well, I don't know if you remember reading about Twitter launching fleets a few weeks ago.

Mark
Mark

I was aware.

Gisela
Gisela

Yeah. So fleets, for those of you who don't know are stories that disappear within 24 hours within Twitter. So the Twitter version of Snapchat, basically. Yep. We all kind of roll their eyes at this situation, felt a little bit late among other things, but now we see that it was all part of a bigger plan Mark. So basically now you can share your own tweets or somebody else's tweets using the share button in the Twitter app or the Twitter platform and share it straight onto Snapchat stories.

Mark
Mark

So this was something people were doing. They were taking these tweets, they were putting them into their snaps and kind of doing it on their own. Right. This is like a formalized process where they've now made it. So that Twitter goes into your snap as a sticker, then you can mix and match them with other stories. But then when you swipe on that tweet, you're going to get redirected from Snapchat, back to Twitter.

Gisela
Gisela

That is correct. It's like the ecosystems are getting more intricately linked together. So it's kind of classic story. You know, two guys in a garage build a social media platform, goes crazy. It goes international. Users, take it and make it their own, um, kind of hack the features that they want into it. And then the platform is like, okay, I'll give you the feature for real, but this is done in a more intricate way because they're really connecting Snapchat and Twitter. And Twitter is saying that they're testing the same feature for Instagram stories.

Mark
Mark

Yeah, which is interesting because now you're going to have Twitter. It's kind of like the whole tik-tok, getting shared everywhere else, but not really like the video is shared, but not necessarily the intricate being redirected back to the platform.

Gisela
Gisela

Yeah. The connection is not there directly. Like you can share your tic-toks now directly onto Instagram stories or feed, not reels. Interestingly, maybe they're working on that feature, but yeah, this is more, it's going to be a more seamless experience.

Mark
Mark

Like it's not like we haven't seen this before people were downloading their snap filters, putting them on Instagram stories, but then you obviously knew it was from Snapchat. Now. Tik Tok gets downloaded and put on Instagram. Everybody knows what's going on here, but what's cool is that this is being formalized. My only question is what's in it for Snapchat.

Gisela
Gisela

That is a good question that I don't have the answer to right now, but I mean, I know for Twitter, for sure. It's tapping into the Snapchat audience. So I guess for Snapchat is tapping into the Twitter audiences, well, a lot of them, people on Snapchat may have been Twitter users and moved out. Plus there's younger generations on Snapchat that may have not used Twitter ever before. So it's a way for Twitter to reclaim their audience or to gain new ones. And for Snapchat, I don't know.

Mark
Mark

 Maybe it's like they want to hook you in, you get a little taste of the Snapchat and then you want to stay and hang out a little more. We've recently seen them invest more into their creator program and content they're creating. So if you want to try it out, this feature is starting out on, um, the iOS app and you're going to have to wait if you're an Android person. But apparently it's coming, moving on the U S government has officially sued Facebook. Gisela why is this bait and what's happening?

Gisela
Gisela

Okay. first of all, this is the result of remember a few weeks ago, we saw the result of this 18 month long investigation from the judiciary into big tech. So they really scrutinized Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. And now this is, I think this is the first action taken as a result of that. So now the us government is formally suing Facebook for basically monopolizing the industry.

Mark
Mark

Okay. So this is the major headline, but it's still kind of bait at the same time.

Gisela
Gisela

First of all, it's going to take forever for ever. So until we see any thing come out of this and any effect, it's going to take a long, long time. But also this long, long time, it takes, it buys time for Facebook to make it harder. For anybody to split it up. So one of the possible outcomes of this is that the government says you need to split. Instagram has to be its own thing. WhatsApp, its own thing. Facebook, I don't think, but now Facebook is really connecting for example, it's messenger tool. So all three tools are completely connected into one, which would make it a lot harder to split up. But technically this is one yeah. Example of what they can do. And in the meantime, which just saw last week, they bought customers. So they keep buying.

Mark
Mark

Yeah, it's not slowed them down any, they unilaterally expand their offering and integrate everything into one sort of whole element under the big umbrella of Facebook.

Gisela
Gisela

Right. So, yeah, I'm not too, I don't know. I didn't see too much feature of this yet. We'll see. Maybe in a year or two.

Mark
Mark

It's a big deal, but we're going to have to wait to see what fruit is born from this. But it's interesting Bill Gates made a comment last year that if Microsoft had not been distracted by the government antitrust laws that started in 1998, you know, for him, he believes that windows and not Google's Android could have been the world's most popular smartphone system, which is kind of interesting that, you know, still got a bit of a grudge.

Gisela
Gisela

Yeah, that's true. Mike, super interesting that looking back, he feels that that really. Slow them down. So that may be the case for Facebook as well. We'll see.

Mark
Mark

All right. Let's get into the story that we've been sort of tracking for a couple of weeks now, and that is YouTube introducing a new feature to address toxic comments. This is obviously a conversation that the two of us talk about quite a lot, working in marketing, working with all of these different platforms. There are a lot of places where people can comment on things and it is. Not very polite. You know, the troll army is out there who liked to make people's lives miserable by saying terrible, horrible things. You know, some obviously done on purpose. I'm less so, but this is probably the first formalized attempt by one of the major players to put some thought back into the power of social media and how to let's say protect the wellbeing of some of its creators.

Gisela
Gisela

Yes. Okay. So first we should explain what's going on, right? What YouTube is doing. So they're coming up with a feature where if they think that'll the commentary about to say sounds abusive in some way, they give you a pop-up and they ask you to think about it and reconsider before posting because the comment can be hurtful. So it's a little bit like Twitter did this, I think this year also where they asked you to read before you retweet. It's a little bit like that.

Mark
Mark

Yeah. The Twitter one is really was I think, based on that whole election period spreading of fake information or.

Gisela
Gisela

Yeah. And same with Covid, right? Yeah. It was that whole thing about, um, thinking about before spreading news that may or may not be true.

Mark
Mark

Well cause twitter really in that instance where, you know, did you read this before you retweet?They put the onus on the poster, like the person who actually is sending it out, but Twitter's really gotten into the habit of. Especially with COVID, especially during the election and a lot of Donald Trump's, you know, outlandish things. We're putting a little disclaimer saying like, this is debatable basically right along the bottom. Whereas this one is, I feel it is telling the people who are writing those comments, like, Hey, this, this might be a stupid ass thing for you to say, this might be hurtful. But there are other things that they're, that they're doing for the creators that might help their overall mental health.

Gisela
Gisela

Yeah. Like they're also beginning to test a filter that allows creators to avoid having to even read some of the hurtful comments on their channel that have been automatically held back. So it's a two way process. They ask the poster to reconsider the poster may not give a shit and post anyway, the comment. So they give a chance to the creator to not read it if they don't want to. Because think about like, Creators that have hundreds of thousands of comments. It can be very hurtful when you start to read hundreds that are negative, even over little things, the accumulation can be very detrimental for your emotional and mental health.

Mark
Mark

Yeah. I mean, there are a lot of people you hear, you know, I think I've heard Mark Baron talk about this and other creators that like, you can have thousands of things. That'll be super nice about what you've done, but then there's going to be that one comment where it's like, Oh, you look like pagans stilts. And you're like, Oh my God. And it just ruins all of the other sort of positive equity that's been built up. But then at the same time, you're starting to infringe on free speech of the users.

Gisela
Gisela

That is correct. It's a very, very fine line that we're going to have to learn to walk and figure out somehow, where does my freedom and then yours begin. And where is it acceptable for them to overlap? It's a very touchy thing. Same with what comments are banned or not banned. What content is allowed to show up on Instagram feeds and what content is not.

Mark
Mark

But at the same time, I'd argue, it's a big discussion in the abstract, but in reality, these are private companies who can do whatever they want with the content that appears on their platform.

Gisela
Gisela

Very very true. So they can say, whatever, this is not appropriate. It's gone this video, doesn't meet our standards. It's gone. What's interesting. Is YouTube is someone who actively seems to be projecting at least that they care. Yes. And I do appreciate the boss, right? I think the boss is important just from, I can get this out of my head, but I was sitting next to my 13 year old niece. And a movie theater back before COVID where we could do that. And before the movie started, she was just kind of going through her Instagram feed. And she was automatically liking, in all of her friends, photos, like, like, like she wasn't even looking at what she was endorsing. And to me, like it's an endorsement, right. It means that I saw it. I read about it. I approve the sources. Correct. You know, there are so many things that I consider before hitting the like button. Whereas for her generation, it's just an automatic, like. Smile or something, and maybe it's just a generational difference. But at the same time, I think it's important to teach the younger kids about thinking about where information is coming from, because it can become very, very loose.

Mark
Mark

And also that their words have power.

Gisela
Gisela

Totally. Just because you're hiding behind the screen or not hiding, but you're sitting behind the screen behind a phone. Doesn't mean that the worst don't have power.

Mark
Mark

Is that it?

Gisela
Gisela

I think that's it. After life lesson for the younger generations.

Mark
Mark

Dropping that truth bomb for the coming generations. I think that's it. Thanks to CloudRaker for providing support for podcasts. We should state, obviously these opinions, our own. Other than that, any last words, Gisela?

Gisela
Gisela

Happy holidays.

Mark
Mark

That's right. And to you and the rest of our listeners, all 10 of you. Thank you very much for listening and we hope you have a wonderful time with your loved ones.

Gisela
Gisela

 Oh yeah. And for next year, resolutions, I would add listen to more click bait and switch and share it with your friends if you like it.

Mark
Mark

Thanks. Bye.

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