2020: Week 02 | The Sweet Sounds of 2021

2020: Week 02 | The Sweet Sounds of 2021 cover image
On today’s show, Mark and Gisela discuss the buzz word “e-tail”, how Facebook is freaking out at Apple, and more moves in the “audio content” world.

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Transcript

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

Welcome to Clickbait & Switch, a marketing podcast that tries to cut through the bullshit and hook you up with what you need to know, what you don't and what stories should be getting more love than they're getting on market. Let's get on the other mic is Gisela Sleizer. 

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Hello

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

On today's show, there's a new buzzword: E-tail. Facebook freaks out, and have you heard about this thing called audio content? You have because you're listening to it right now. So welcome to 2021. Couple of things we didn't mention in the crystal ball episode that I'm sure we'll be talking a lot about:in 2021 is: regulations.

Basically. That's how 2020 was ending before the continuing disruption of pandemic and chaos gripped all of our collective imaginations, over the past couple of weeks. So laws and regulations around data management and digital business practices are going to be huge this year. Here in Canada, we have Canadian content modifications that are coming through. In the US, you basically have the government suing your big tech companies, all of your favorites. The EU is proposing new strict rules that would govern the way that big tech operates within their region. 

You have Apple taking on the world with app store fees, the current feud with Facebook around user data. You've got Facebook really mad at Apple, which we will get to. Then you've got the center for humane technology tapping into the general public's sentiment of just chaos and paranoia with the social dilemma on Netflix. All of that is going to continue in 2021, and so will our first click. Let's talk about e-tail.

So if you couldn't figure out what e-tail stands for, it's electronic retail. So the whole online shopping, you know, that became the way of life in 2020 in its entirety. This is basically, you know, how internet of things is a fancy way of saying anything that uses the internet. So e-tail is retail on the internet. Very important. But we saw this evolve Gisela! 

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

We have, we all experienced a boxing day and boxing week online this year.

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

Boxing month!

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Since April, we've been shopping for the holidays. But that said during the holiday period, Walmart, out of all people out there in the world teamed up with TikTok.

Remember Walmart tried to kind of buy TikTok in the US that didn't go through. So they ended up just teaming up for a virtual runway that they call the Holiday-Shopalong-Spectacular. So what they did is partner with young influencers on the platform who use their own language and their own ways to choose their favorite items on Walmart online, they show them off on TikTok and you can still shop them online. So that was one thing, one kind of new thing. Interesting. Because Walmart is trying to stay relevant right? And tap into the younger audience, new social media. So yeah, trying to kind of stay in the game. 

And we also saw Bitmoji characters that now allow you to basically play dress up. For those of you who don't know what a Bitmoji is, don't be ashamed. It's okay. It's basically a 3D emoji of yourself that you can build like an animation emoji of yourself that you can create using the Bitmoji app, which is owned by Snapchat. I think you can also create one on Snap, directly on the platform and now you'll be able to dress them with a variety of clothes from different retailers and brands online. So it's a new way to kind of, game-ify trying on new clothes. 

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

But I guess you'd have to be really accurate with how you depict your Bitmoji. Like, I feel like Bitmoji is everyone's like super sexy kind of Simpsons version of themselves. Whereas like, if you're slightly portly or slightly wrinkly, you'd almost have to like, Oh! Well would I look really good in this sweater?

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

I don't know. Maybe that's why you use Bitmojis for, but I'm pretty accurate with my Bitmoji I think, but yeah, no, I think it's very interesting. Snapchat also came out with a new kind of AR filter with the new iPhone, iPhone 12, where it also responds to the environment. So really this idea of trying things on and even trying things on in an environment is getting more and more and more a part of e-tail.

We saw Ikea do something similar with an app, where you can test things out and how they will look in your home in like real size. Now there's new features, this new filter from snap. For example, in the example, you can see glitter falling on someone and it kind of falls all over their body and then they leave the scene and the glitter continues to fall. So, it's really real. We'll put a link to that on our newsletter, by the way. You can sign up in the show notes. 

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

So this is kind of like the digital version of when Lululemon bought Mirror, right? Cause that was supposed to be the in-store version where you can try things on without having to try them on. But this is now just doing it on your phone. 

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Mark, you're opening a whole new can of worms because that's more sophisticated e-tail. So, Lululemon was one of the first, if not the first, to reinvent the retail environment and what it does. Blending in the studio with shopping. So now blending e-tail with fitness at home, within the community, through the mirror.

So yeah, totally an extension of this new e-tail idea, but in a whole other level. 

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

So yeah, totally an extension of this new e-tail idea, but in a whole other level. 

All right, let's move on to something that we find a little bait-y this week, and this is where you're going to play a little solo ball. So Facebook has gotten a little belligerent and is trying to get small businesses and marketers at large to hate Apple.

So I'm just going to clear out the floor, let you operate here.

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

I am outraged at what's going on, Mark. I'm going to try to unpack it. Back in June, Apple unveiled, new privacy and data user policies applicable to all apps in the store. These are known as ad-tracking transparency framework or even nutritional labels in the app store.

So that gives you a hint of what they intend to do. Basically, what this means is that all developers will have to, in their app descriptions and in their apps, outline what their privacy practice is and if they use data for third party actions: describe what data they're collecting, how the data may be used and whether the data is used to track users.

So examples of how third party data can be used is: advertising and retargeting ads and location sharing, so that you could be targeted based on your location, and even the way we track results for ads. 

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

So in the best case scenario, all of that is done to help you get things that are relevant to you at certain times and in its worst case is just absolutely abuse and targeting you with that nonstop. 

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Yes. But the big deal here is that most people don't know this is happening. I mean, some people know and understand it, but especially younger generations, they may not understand that this is happening and why  they happened to be seeing an ad for this store when they happened to be close by, walking by, maybe they thought it was fake, but actually it was advertising data.

So with these new policies, every app will have to get user consent for the app to continue gathering this data. So in other words, apps like Facebook will have to ask users, is it okay for us to use your data and track your actions so we can sell it to advertisers? And people have the choice to say no. Of course Facebook is freaking out because this is messing with their business model.

However, that's not they're saying. Basically what Facebook is doing is reaching out to this database of marketers and small businesses and we're being invited to webinars where they open by saying that the material was confidental, which I thought was kind of hilarious. 

And what they explain is that Apple's policy is one, selfish because they didn't consult with the industry before making these changes. I'm sure Facebook consults with the industry all the time and its competitors before making any changes to its platform. 

Two, these new policies that are about profit, not privacy, they say. Meanwhile, Facebook is all about wellness and not for profit, right? This is why they're complaining about their business model being challenged. 

And three, that they're hurting small businesses and publishers who are already struggling in the pandemic. This is such an opportunistic message, come on! What is Facebook doing to help small businesses? Yes. They're coming out with all these features, which are all paid. It's like, come on, no shame. It's crazy. Facebook has completely politicized this matter and just the approach and the tone that they're using to do this blows my mind.

They created this website that is called Speak Up for Small. So it's facebook.com/business/appleiOS14SpeakUpforSmallBusiness. And it really looks like a cause, like save the world. It's just crazy. At the same time, WhatsApp has updated its privacy policy right now. So you must accept to data collection in order to continue using the platform. So, a lot of things are going on here and really what we're seeing is this shift towards first party cookies that is coming, getting closer and closer to us.

Just wreaking havoc in the industry because apps like Facebook will have to reimagine their offer to continue to make a profit.

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

I mean, it's hard to have a sympathy for either Facebook or Apple in this, you know, both of them are these absolute behemoths. You know, one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse and Facebook is obviously trying to protect its own image. Apple is doing its own thing.

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

The tone that Facebook is taking is what's bothering me the most, I think. 

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

All right. Let's move on to the switch this week in that is audio. So audio, obviously, another thing that we're going to hear a lot about this week, pun intended, Scott Galloway, the patron Saint of the Clickbait & Switch podcast predicts a flurry of acquisitions and podcasts getting featurized.

And if you've been paying attention to that sort of space recently, in the past year, there's been some huge acquisitions. Spotify being one of the main players, lining up not only Joe Rogan, but also acquiring Ringer podcast network. So two massive deals for a lot of content that's giving Spotify some premium content that's only available on their platform, which is pretty fascinating, but three big things happen while we're all sort of stay-cation over the holidays, break them down for us Gisela. 

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

So Amazon bought Wondery  Wondery is a podcast platform that appeared back in 2016, kind of partly funded by 20th Century Studios or 20th Century Fox, as we might have known them. They have a bunch of notable podcasts that. I myself never heard of, but they seem to be famous. Perhaps you have Mark, American History Tellers, Dirty John, and Doctor Death. 

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

None of those are in my feed, no.

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Yeah. They're not in my feed either, but anyways, now Amazon can really compete in the audio industry beyond search, right? So they can really compete with the likes of Sirius.

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

Sirius XM

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Which you might have in your car. Spotify, Apple. Another cool thing that happened is that Netflix is testing out an audio only mode on its Android app. Essentially what this is, is you can turn a video and just listen to your favorite show, which is an interesting shift for Netflix that has been trying a bunch of new stuff, like they try that shorts feature that I now have on my phone, it's kind of cool, with previews of comedies. 

And then the third  thing that happened is that Twitter acquired a broadcasting app called: Breakers. So tutor, basically the Breaker team will be coming into the Twitter team to help "improve" the health of the public conversation on Twitter itself. And they're also gonna be helping with a new audio based networking project that we've been talking about in the past few episodes as well, Twitter spaces 

Another cool thing that Twitter did over the holidays, by an agency, the Ueno agency. So that's kind of interesting that Twitter is buying all of this expertise and bringing them in house, no?

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

I think Twitter's going to have a big year, cause we all know that it's been just an absolute tire fire of human experience for the past four years. So it's gonna be interesting to see where they go. Moving forward, especially with the current bands in place. So that's very interesting. 

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

Yeah. So audio is going to be a big thing for Twitter and all other platforms.

I'm sure we'll continue to see more in terms of like voice memos and how we text via voice. You know, audio books are still around. Voice search is getting more and more efficient, which I find interesting, especially because we're all kind of getting tired of video, right?

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

Yeah. It's certainly been a saturation of video throughout 2020.

Gisela Sleizer
Gisela Sleizer

And, I think that's a good beginning to 2021.

Mark Dolynskyj
Mark Dolynskyj

Thank you to CloudRaker for providing support for our podcast, but we should statethat the opinions in this and all of these episodes that we record our own, Mark and Gisela. They are not that of our overlords at CloudRaker. So thanks to them 

& see you next week!

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